Spicer’s apology, as heartfelt as it may be, doesn’t entirely resolve the issue. He is enmeshed in an Administration in which designations of us and them, our people and not our people, the good ones and the bad ones, provide a rubric for almost every policy. For Spicer to revert, as a default, to such terms in explaining why Assad is worse than Hitler suggests that he—and, it is a safe guess, others in the White House—are either not registering the implications of what their boss is saying or are doing so all too well.