January Wrap-Up: Race, Nation and the Black Atlantic

Here’s what I read this January; Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury, The Fateful Triangle by Stuart Hall, Just Us by Claudia Rankine, Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi.

“I don’t believe in men. I’ve never met a man in my life.”

Today, Guernica Magazine published a great, insightful and inciting interview with South Asian trans performance duo DarkMatter. For instance, this is how they expand upon the above statement that Alok never met a man:Janani Balasubramanian: I think what Alok was saying with the idea of how we’ve never met a man in our lives, is …

“The Gray Complexity that is the Real Dixie”

Errin Whack,in an article for NPR’s Code Switch blog, reviews Harper Lee’s new novel Go Set A Watchman and argues that it is a revelation on race, even if that is uncomfortable for many fans of To Kill A Mockingbird:Truths can be hard, and truths about race in this country are often the hardest – especially when the revelations …

Black Women’s Activism and Suffrage in Oklahoma Territory

A topic often discussed in recent time on progressive, feminist, anti-racist sites is how  the default term “women” refers to white women, while the work, struggle, and issues of women of color are not mentioned, erased, ignored. One example of this is the discussion in the US regarding this year’s equal pay day. The pay …

Multicultural Books, Children, and the Social Construction of Identity

As Bookseller Elizabeth Bluemle points out in “True or False? Multicultural Books Don’t Sell: We Are the Problem, We Are the Solution”: “Time and time again, at the bookstore and at children’s book festivals, I have observed white children picking up books with kids of color on the cover, and heard adults express surprise at the choice. “Are …