Faraday and me.
(I travelled to London for work last week and just now get around to looking through the pictures.) #latergram #london #thewas #iet #kingscollege #lastweek #selfie #clarityandchaos

Got an hour to spare in London, so I did my two favorite things to do in a city: Buy books and drink good coffee!

Picked up Ali Smith’s Autumn and Brexit and the British by Stephen Green. Now I’m enjoying a great flat white at The CoffeeWorks Project.

#coffee #bookstagram #igreads #flatwhite #london #instatravel #hauscuriosities #penguinbooks #manbooker #clarityandchaos

Flat white and Tyehimba Jess’ OLIO #igreads #bookstagram #poetry #Konstanz #weekdaypleasures #noelf #clarityandchaos

I finished Zadie Smith’s Swing Time this morning. I liked, but did not love it. (more on that maybe later.) Towards the end, the narrator reads Baldwin to someone – so I’m reading Baldwin’s poetry collection as my first book of #nationalpoetrymonth.

“I think it’s logical to assume that many, many black folk fell in love with many, many other black folk. This assumption is the rational consequence of acknowledging black humanity." 

The quoted statement should be obvious, but for long stretches of history, it wasn’t. In “The Dear Pledges of Our Love,” an essay about Philis Wheatley and her husband, the free black man John Peters, Honorée Fanonne Jeffers argues that the negative portrait of Peters in the authoritative literary biography of Wheatley may be an expression of racial stereotypes against Black men. Stereotypes that still exist today. 

In: The Fire This Time: A New Generation Speaks about Race Jesmyn Ward (ed.) Simon & Schuster (2016) 

Obligatory boots in snow picture. #fromwhereistand #fwis #Konstanz #winter #timberland #PTOman #clarityandchaos