Clarity & Chaos
Apr 24, 2014

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Clive Bundy, White Supremacy, and the Historical Reality of Slavery

It shouldn’t really be a surprise that Cliven Bundy, leader of the absurd Nevada cattle tax stand off against “the Feds,”* also is problematic on other fronts. As Ta-Nehisi Coates quotes from a NY Times piece, Bundy had this to say about poor Black people: 

“And because they were basically on government subsidy, so now what do they do?” he asked. “They abort their young children, they put their young men in jail, because they never learned how to pick cotton. And I’ve often wondered, are they better off as slaves, picking cotton and having a family life and doing things, or are they better off under government subsidy? They didn’t get no more freedom. They got less freedom.”

Yeah. 

Coates, who in recently has been writing a lot about the historical and contemporary pervasiveness of white supremacy in US society, goes on to show the grueling reality of chattel slavery in the US with examples from “Thavolia Glymph’s bruising monograph Out of the House of Bondage.”  Coates then concludes: 

When people like Cliven Bundy assert the primacy of the past it is important that we do not recount it selectively. American enslavement is the destruction of the black body for profit. That is the past that Cliven Bundy believes “the Negro” to have been better off in. He is, regrettably, not alone.

(*On a side note, what makes Bundy’s stand so absurd for me is that it’s not a case of age old family land being seized by a cruel tyrant government. It’s a businessman refusing to pay fees for using land that wasn’t his. Theoretically-historically, without ‘the feds,’ Bundy wouldn’t graze his cattle in ‘Murica anyway. He’d be in Mexico, or rather in the land of the Washoe.)

Apr 24, 2014

142 notes
nprbooks:

For the grumpy prescriptivists of the world, there is now an extension for Google Chrome that replaces the word “literally” with the word “figuratively” on the webpages you visit. (Though you’re fighting a losing battle, dear purists: The word’s more colloquial, emphatic sense — as in, “I’m literally going to kill the next person who comments on my use of the word ‘literally’ ” — was recently added to the Oxford English Dictionary.)

nprbooks:

For the grumpy prescriptivists of the world, there is now an extension for Google Chrome that replaces the word “literally” with the word “figuratively” on the webpages you visit. (Though you’re fighting a losing battle, dear purists: The word’s more colloquial, emphatic sense — as in, “I’m literally going to kill the next person who comments on my use of the word ‘literally’ ” — was recently added to the Oxford English Dictionary.)

Apr 23, 2014

537 notes
Libraries tend to become more cozy, relaxing and communicative places. Other than public spaces like museums, they have a certain private character, which makes them a living room for their community.
CNN debunks the myth that libraries are dying. Complement with this wonderful photographic love letter to public libraries.  (via explore-blog)

(via greenteaandcigarettes)

Apr 23, 2014

0 notes
Apr 22, 2014

4,198 notes

medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

The Egyptian Mona Lisa

I never get bored of people playing around with DaVinci’s, especially when non-Western artists provide their own take on the ever-mysterious painting that is the Mona Lisa.

Here, Egyptian illustrator FaTma WaGdi places herself wearing a hijab in her digital rendition of this 16th century portrait, poking fun at the expressionless original subject.

Contemporary Art Week!

Apr 21, 2014

68 notes
whereareyoupress:

-brandon speck

whereareyoupress:

-brandon speck

(Source: brandonspeck)

Apr 20, 2014

6,799 notes
I twittered about this earlier, but sometimes it feels as though talking about misogyny in this industry is like dealing with Groundhog Day: there seems to be a continuous reset, a collective male amnesia around the issue. As if, when a woman speaks out, it’s for the first time and everyone is shocked. Just shocked, I tell you. Sexism exists? OH MY GOD.
Veteran writer Marjorie Liu on sexual harassment/misogny in the comics industry—and the collective amnesia that hits much of the industry every time the topic ever gets broached. (via robot6)

(via awkwardeccentric)

Apr 19, 2014

0 notes
Leaving the last point to one side, if only because I do not understand it, the first two rebuttals do not amount to a defense against the charge of determinism.

Honest introduction to Bourdieu’s concept of habitus by Richard Jenkins. 

Jenkins, Richard. Pierre Bourdieu. London: Routledge (1992) p. 83
Apr 19, 2014

1 note

"Debunking the First Amendment Myths Surrounding Revenge Porn Laws" - Forbes

Danielle Citron, law professor at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, breaks down common arguments against the scourge that is “revenge porn” (nude or sexually explicit pictures of mostly young women posted on the Internet without their consent) and debunks them, using U.S. constitutional jurisprudence:

Some object to criminalizing invasions of sexual privacy because free speech will be chilled. That’s why it is crucial to craft narrow statutes that only punish individuals who knowingly and maliciously invade another’s privacy and trust. Other features of anti-revenge porn laws can ensure that defendants have clear notice about what constitutes criminal activity and exclude innocent behavior and images related to matters of public interest.

Even so, some argue that revenge porn laws are doomed to fail because nonconsensual pornography does not fall within a category of unprotected speech. To criminalize revenge porn, they say, the Court would have to recognize it as new category of unprotected speech, which it would not do. Another argument is that even if law could secure civil remedies for revenge porn, it could not impose criminal penalties because the First Amendment treats criminal and civil laws differently. These objections are unfounded and deserve serious attention lest they be taken seriously.

It’s an interesting read. Citron makes compelling arguments that show possible ways of acting against problematic issues on the Internet without casting too wide a net that would stifle valuable speech.

Apr 18, 2014

330,565 notes
One. Do not promise when you’re happy.
Two. When you are angry, do not respond.
Three. Do not decide when you’re sad.

(via hemped)

This is the most important thing

(via waakeme-up)

(Source: soulist-aurora, via jaguaratnightdrinkingmilk)

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